What’s Your Drop the Mic Moment in Your Presentation…?

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Good presenters have a clear central point.  Great presenters make that point in a compelling and memorable way.  In other words, they have a Drop the Mic Moment.

Too often I see salespeople bury a profound statement in a load of information, rush too quickly into their next point, or worse, over-explain what they just said, diluting the impact of their message all together.

In case you’re unfamiliar with the millions of drop the mic memes, the phrase typically refers to a bold gesture of confidence by a politician or performer from Obama to Kanye, after delivering a great performance or impressive argument or even insult.When a performer drops the mic, it confirms in the audience’s mind that they’ve just experienced something noteworthy.  Something worth remembering.

As buying cycles get longer and more complex, a Drop the Mic Moment can ensure that your key point doesn’t walk out the door with you, or worse, is attributed to your competition.

Here’s what you need to know about creating and delivering a DMM in your presentation or demo.

  • -Identify the  Drop the Mic Moment in Your Presentation
  • -Make your Drop the Mic Moment Memorable
  • -Deliver your Drop the MIC Moment

Good luck…

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Negotiate like Picasso…

 

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The story goes that Picasso was at a social gathering when a woman approached him, gushing with praise for his work. Then, she coyly asked if he would draw her portrait on a napkin, which, of course, she would happily pay for.  Picasso obliged, finished the portrait in under thirty seconds, and charged her 500 francs. “Five hundred francs!” responded the stunned admirer. “But it took you less than thirty seconds!”

“Yes, Madame,” replied Picasso calmly, “And it took me thirty years to be able to do that portrait in just thirty seconds.”

Never Forget Your Value

Whether you manage money, sell advertising, or provide consulting and professional services, there will always be clients who confuse deliverables (what they see) with value received (results).  Sometimes, in the case of Picasso’s admirer, that confusion reflects a buyer’s naivete and ignorance. Other times, in the case of my friend’s client, that confusion is feigned by a buyer to test your limits.

In the former case, educate the client to the true value received to clear up the confusion and solve the problem. In the latter situation, remain calm, restate your value, and hold your ground to signal you stand behind your value and that further pressure tactics will not work.  You can even tell the Picasso story to reinforce your point.

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What makes it art…??

 

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A friend, commenting on a new building, “I’m not sure if I hate it or love it! I want to hate it but I think I love it…”

Without that tension, all you’ve done is what’s been done before.

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Learning from the rejection…

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When someone doesn’t say yes, they’ll often give you a reason.

A common trap: Believe the reason.

If you start rebuilding your product, your pitch and your PR based on the stated reason, you’re driving by looking in the rear view mirror.

The people who turn you down have a reason, but they’re almost certainly not telling you why.

Fake reasons: I don’t like the color, it’s too expensive, you don’t have enough references, there was a typo in your resume.

Real reasons: My boss won’t let me, I don’t trust you, I’m afraid of change.

By all means, make your stuff better. More important, focus on the unstated reasons that drive most rejections. And most important: Shun the non-believers and sell to people who want to go on a journey with you.

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The toddler strategy…

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Most people don’t get too upset at anything a two-year-old kid says to them.

That’s because we don’t believe that toddlers have a particularly good grasp on the nuances of the world, nor do they possess much in the way of empathy. Mostly, though, it turns out that getting mad at a toddler doesn’t do any good, because he’s not going to change as a result (not for a few years, anyway).

Couldn’t the same be said for your uninformed critics? For the people who bring you down without knowing any better, for those that sabotage your best work, or undermine your confidence for selfish reasons?

It’s hardly productive to ruin your day and your work trying to teach these folks a lesson.

Better, I think, to treat them like a toddler. Buy them a lollipop, smile and walk away.

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Are you hiring a Professional, amateur or a Job filler..

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If you want something done, perhaps you would ask a professional to do it. Someone who costs a lot but is worth more than they charge. Someone who shows up even when she doesn’t feel like it. Someone who stands behind her work, gets better over time and is quite serious indeed about the transaction.

Or perhaps you could hire a passionate amateur. That’s a forum leader doing it for love, not money. An obsessive in love with the craft. A talented person willing to trade income for the chance to do what he loves, with freedom.

Please, though, don’t hire someone who just thinks it’s a job. This category represents the majority of your options, and this category is what gives work a bad name.

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If your organization or even your career is stuck;it may just be because of this chart….

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Understanding Local Max

My guess is that you’ve been wrestling with your Local Max.
If your organization or even your career is stuck, it may just be because of this chart.
Localmaxw
Everyone starts at that dot at the bottom left corner. You’re not succeeding because you haven’t started yet.

Then you try something. If it works, you end up at point A.

A is where you see results as the direct output of a strategy and hard work. A is the job you got after investing in an a Diploma,a Degree or MBA. A is the sales you got after running an ad.

Of course, being a success-oriented capitalist, that’s not enough. So you do more. You push and hone and optimize until you end up at the Local Max. The Local Max is where your efforts really pay off.

So you try harder. And you end up at point B. Point B is a bummer. Point B is backwards. Point B is where the outcome of more effort against your strategy doesn’t return better results. So you retreat. You go back to your Local Max.

And that is where most people stay. Most people get stuck at the Local Max because changing strategy in any direction (this is really a 3D chart, but I’ve smushed it to make it easier) leads to poorer results.

You’ve got a very good job as an art director. To do better, you’d either have to move to another firm, move to another town, switch careers,learn new skills or go back to school. And all of them require some Investment(cash and time) and very uncertain returns, so you stay….

You have 100 competitors in an industry that is self-described as a commodity. You use the same tactics your competition does, because if you change your pricing or fundamentally alter your marketing outreach, you get punished in terms of sales or profits.

You’ve got upcoming holiday camp with 80 kids in it. If you want to grow, you’ve learned the hard way that hiring one or two more senior staff people won’t work, because you can’t afford them. So you stick with what you’ve got.

The lie of Local Max is this: the chart is incomplete. It really looks like this:

Localmax2_3

Local Max isn’t actually that great when you realize that Big Max is not particularly far away.

The problem is that to get to Big Max, you need to go through step C, which is a horrible and scary place to be.You need to continue working on your different strategies while results are sinking. Learn new skills,try new things,manage office,home or market politics,spend more time and resources e.t.c while remaining focused.

There were 10,000 single-location hamburger restaurants in the world when Ray Kroc decided to build a giant chain of franchised McDonald’s. Anyone could have done it. No one did. Because everyone who tried had to go through point C to get there. It took Colonel Sanders more than a decade of pain to get through point C.How about Royal Media Services (Citizen) and its founder Dr. S. K Macharia for Kenyan Market..This team managed to push through point C dispelling the odds-Established competitors, political influence ,regulatory hitches and more importantly keeping up relevant innovations.

Of course, it’s not just about growing sales or revenues. The Big Max/Local Max paradox affects everything from education to non-profits to politicians. If you have a “Max”, whatever you’re measuring, the odds are you’re actually dealing with a Local Max, not the Big one.

If your market is changing, this idea is even more important to understand. That’s because changing markets are always surfacing new Big Max points, and the only way to get to them is to go through the pain (yes, it’s painful) of point C.

You can’t reinvent yourself and your organization until you deal with the fear of point C, and that’s hard to do without talking about it. I think the benefit of the Local Max curve is that it makes it easy for you and your team to have the conversation.

 


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Three Key Tips on Business Development…

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1.Buyer and seller. If you’ve ever pitched a product or service to a business, you know how soul-deadening it can be. The buyer works hard to make it clear that she’s doing you a favor, and you need every dog and every pony available at all times (and you better be the cheapest). But business development doesn’t have this dichotomy. Both sides are buying, both sides are selling, right? So talented business development people never act like jaded buyers, arms folded, demanding this and that. Instead, from the start, they seek out partners.

2.Enthusiasm is underrated. Business development people are exploring the unknown. That means that there’s more than cash on the table, there’s bravery and initiative and excitement. The best business development people I’ve ever worked with are able to capture the energy in the room and amplify it. They’ll build on the ideas being presented, not make them smaller.
What’s happening at your shop?

3. End well. Most of the time, even good business development deals fall down before the end of the negotiation process. If a deal doesn’t come together, say so. Acknowledge what went wrong, thank the other party and end well. If it does come together, track the integration and stay involved enough to learn from what works and what doesn’t. I’m still waiting to hear from people who said they’d get back to me “tomorrow” fifteen years ago, but I’m losing hope… Ending well not only teaches you how to do better next time, but it keeps doors open for when you need to come back to someone who you should have done a deal with in the first place.

Good Luck.

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Brand humility…

 

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In the battle for attention or market share, the market makes new decisions every day.(note that first)

And the market tends to be selfish. Often, it will pick the arrogant market leader (because the market also tends to be lazy), but upstarts and new competitors always have an incentive to change the game or the story.

Brand humility is the only response to a fast-changing and competitive marketplace.

The humble brand understands that it needs to re-earn attention, re-earn loyalty and reconnect with its audience as if every day is the first day.

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Hero or star?

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In 1947 David Robert Jones was born in South London.
He formed his first band at the wide-eyed age of 15.
And then magnificently metamorphosed.
From a performer at weddings into a hero of our times.
Major Tom, Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane.
The incomparable David Bowie.
A hero, not a star.
I recently listened to Bowie’s final creation “Blackstar.”
And I watched his startling “Lazarus” video.
With the dying Bowie portrayed as a hospital patient.
And the hero/star distinction became glaringly clear.
Stars are static.
Like stars in the sky, they’re always there.
They comfort us, provide assurance, warmth and light.
There are no surprises with stars.
They give us what we expect of them.
Like John Wayne or Jimmy Buffet.
Heroes are dynamic.
They’re unpredictable.
They see things differently.
They possess an inquisitive openness to life.
They dare and they stretch.
Themselves and us.
Our beliefs in what’s acceptable and what’s possible.
Heroes do a service to mankind.
They’re precursors of cultural change and growth.
They change the way we look at the world.
And how we see ourselves.
Our identities, our potential.
Heroes move us.
There are billions of stars.
People who help us feel safe and comfortable.
And that’s a good thing.
Heroes are scarce.
And absolutely essential to our evolution.
Because they experiment and create.
They change things.
They push humanity forward.
About a week before his death, Bowie called his producer.
He told him he wanted to make one more album.
And so during his final weeks, a dying and passionate Bowie created five fresh songs.
David Jones may be a Starman now.
But he was truly a hero on Earth.
Someday we’ll all be starmen and starwomen.
In the meantime, ask yourself.
Who will I be during my brief human journey?
Hero or star?

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